Passion, authenticity, and unapologetic joy: Women of Influence Summit 2016

This post is a continuation of the previously posted: Women of Influence Summit: A can’t-miss event

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The Women of Influence Summit 2016 presented by Next Monday (the first of its kind) promised”to give your influence a name, to identify what makes your power special.” A movement, this conference intended to help you continue to carry on your influence to all those around you, each and every day.

And it did not disappoint.

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With over 300 women gathered together on a rainy day on the campus of the College of St. Benedict’s, the summit kicked off not with a bang, but with a swell. A swell that continued to grow and expand with every conversation – every connection – made throughout the day. But what began as a whisper left as a roar, thanks much in part to the amazing speakers and willing attendees present.

There was so much to be gleaned from the influential minds in the room that day, but an overarching theme became more apparent with each speaker: Be true to yourself, stop apologizing for doing what you love, and follow your heart & passion wherever it leads you. Several speakers hammered this point home, and while I didn’t get to experience them all, I can summarize here some of what I learned at the 2016 Women of Influence Summit.

1. Be aware that you are rare. 

This came directly from a breakout speaker, Trace Wiese, as a reminder for us all that we are each unique, different, and a little weird – and that’s wonderful. Her session, along with several others, emphasized the importance of living authentically. That is to say:

“Who you are, at the core, when you’re at your best, with and for others.”

If you have trouble defining your authentic self, or being able to communicate your values, think about what your mentor or best friend would say about you. What would they say is your greatest quality? That’s likely your #1 value you can own, emanate, and be proud of. Me? I discovered my intentional value is “Helpful.” And in every way I can, I’ve tried to keep that top-of-mind in what I’m doing. You know what? It’s pretty darn accurate.

“The trick is to not let people know how weird you are until it’s too late for them to back out.” – Zac Galifianakis

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2. Slow the &$%@ down.

Jaci Finneman… where to even start with this woman. Her talk on being “Mrs. Over Do It” resonated with me to my core. Her struggles with not putting herself first, and her desire to be helping others at all times – even when it wasn’t needed or wanted – is something that so many women battle with every day. Why is it that we as women feel the need to exercise control, balance and perfection over everything? Where did this expectation come from, both internally and externally? Who knows, really, but the point is that it’s time to slow the &$%@ down and notice what the world is telling us. Watch for signs. Keep your ears and eyes open to those around you. Pick up on cues and hints. And know when it’s time for you to make a change for yourself. Know when to say “enough is enough,” and when to indulge yourself in your dreams and wants. Once you reach that point, tear up your to-do list, grab a glass of wine (or pint of ice cream or whatever your vice may be), and remember that it’s perfectly okay to put yourself first.

“That was the day she made herself promise to live more from intention and less from habit.” – Amy Rubin Flett

3. Stop making choices out of fear.

To paraphrase Katie Manar’s breakout session, we make 100’s of choices daily – how many are out of fear? Well, that answer may lie in this next question: When was a time you reacted less than your best? Chances are, when we react less than our best, it’s because we’re making a decision out of fear – fear on the surface level as well as fear that is hidden deep down in a place we may not even know about. When we let fear drive our decisions, we get stuck. We either avoid situations that we’re afraid of, or we react in a way we wouldn’t have under normal circumstances. If we remember to put love first – to think with our hearts and not with our fears – we will be able to portray our true selves better each day.

Fear is a real thing – but we can change how it effects us by how we allow ourselves to react.

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4. “Remember, everyone else is faking it too.”

A quote shared by Maria Surma Manka, who heard it first from her boss. What an important reminder, especially when we find ourselves caught up in the haste, the bustle and the craziness of everyday life. In Maria’s session, we talked about worry, and the fact that humans are built to worry. It’s natural. It’s common. It’s expected. It’s universal. So how can we best handle our worries to remain productive, positive and happy? By looking at our types of worry – practical versus hypothetical – we can determine how to best approach strategies for dealing with them. If we’re worrying about concrete, literal issues, deconstructing them into hard facts and absolutes helps. If we’re worrying about the future and all its vagueness, we should schedule time to let ourselves worry, but not go beyond that. And the best remedy for worry? Celebration. Celebrate the big things, yes, but celebrate the little things. Because in the end, life is pretty dang great, and we need to remember and appreciate that as much as possible.

“Worry is like a rocking chair: it gives you something to do, but never gets you anywhere.” – Erma Bombeck

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5. Don’t give up on your dreams.

The opening keynote spoke of extreme tragedy. As a young, vibrant, talented dancer, Nicole Marquez’s life nearly ended after a tragic accident that left her physically impaired. She was told she would never walk again, let alone dance. So what did she do? She got her mind in the game, she gave every ounce of focus, grit and determination she could muster, and eventually – she danced. Her story along with several others throughout the day spoke of the importance of the determination, grit, and heart that it takes to achieve your dreams. The key things to remember? Surround yourself with supportive people, and know that you have to choose to make the best of the situation – only you can truly find your strength.

“Not only can you reach for the stars, but you can grab them, and girl – you can fly!”

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The closing keynote had many of the same messages as Nicole. Gaia Nova moved from Bulgaria to France at age 18, and now lives in Chicago and has founded her own company, Power Tower. Gaia’s story is also one of resilience and never being satisfied with less than her ultimate dreams. The most inspirational part of her speech was not in what she said, but how she said it. Mid-speech, it became clear that she was extremely nervous and having a hard time communicating to us. So what did she do? Took a step back, admitted that this was really hard for her, and confessed that she was facing her biggest fear by speaking to us. And what did we do, after a long day of inspiration, passion, and women empowerment? We cheered. We clapped. We shouted words of encouragement. We stood together for the remainder of her speech, providing a wall of support for Gaia. And she finished her inspirational story, faced her fear, and we all celebrated with her.

“If you want something you’ve never had, you have to do something you’ve never done.” – Thomas Jefferson

Whew! Feeling like you can take on the world yet? Ready to kick some a$$? That’s how I felt after the Summit, and that’s how you, as a woman, should feel every single day. The hard work of Next Monday organizing this event and the amazing speakers (I wish I could have heard them all!) made the 2016 Women of Influence Summit a day to truly remember forever.

So don’t ever forget: be true to yourself, put your needs first, don’t let fear rule your decisions, worry within reason, and never, ever give up on your dreams.

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#EmilyFayeSays

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This is why you network

As you may know, I spent the last 2.5 years as an account manager at an advertising and marketing agency in St. Cloud, MN. Flint Group was my home, and I loved nearly every moment there. But unfortunately, as life in the agency world so often goes, my position was recently eliminated in some agency restructuring, and  I found myself thrust into the world of job hunting.

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From hourly refreshes of Indeed.com to numerous LinkedIn messages and dozens of resume and cover letter tweaks, I felt like a college senior again. After scheduling many interviews, I started to notice a common theme. Each interviewer I met with told me that they really want me to be interviewing them and their company as well… and I knew my pause was palpable. I tried to swallow this pit as I smiled and nodded, praising the companies and expressing my extreme interest with as much enthusiasm as I could, but my lack of excitement lingered.

Then one night, my phone beeped with a Facebook message, and when I opened it up and saw a name I recognized only professionally, I froze. It was the Executive Director of the St. Cloud Area Convention and Visitors Bureau. She had an opening for a marketing position, and had gotten my name through a mutual contact who knew I was facing the end of my time at Flint Group. Would I be interested in learning more?

I almost fainted with excitement.

Later that week, I scheduled an afternoon meeting with her, Julie, from the CVB, and it took me approximately 2.38 seconds to realize that my dreams were about to come true. 2 weeks later, I received a phone call. The job – Social Media & Marketing Specialist position at the St. Cloud Area Convention and Visitors Bureau – was mine if I wanted it. And I never even had to apply for it.

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Needless to say, I accepted the position immediately, and I’m currently in my fifth week of employment. The job is more than I could have ever hoped for, and while I’m qualified because of my skills, I really got the position because of who I know. So now, time for a shout-out to…

NET-FREAKIN’-WORKING

Through my time at Flint Group, I was fortunate to have the flexibility to go to numerous networking groups, stay very actively involved in the community, and meet a number of influential people in the St. Cloud business community. I built relationships with business owners, young professionals and everyone in between.

In my 2 weeks of “unemployment,” I received at least 4 other calls from people who I knew through networking groups who wanted to see if they could help. I was offered short-term positions, side jobs, references and more. And in the end, I technically didn’t even have to apply for my new position at the CVB – my name was referred by a mutual contact through a networking group. I would never have gotten this job without her referral.

The point I’m really trying to make here, is to never give up on your networking, because you never know how it will help you. Sure, I was always representing Flint Group at my networking events, hoping to drive sales, awareness, etc. But really, I was representing myself even more than I knew. Was I attending meetings to find a new job? No, not even a little. But because I’ve taken the time & effort to build relationships with other business professionals, I now have a network that I can rely on for more than just sales calls. And honestly, that feels pretty good.

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To sum it up, I’d like to thank all those in the St. Cloud Area who put their names on the line for me in the name of helping me find my next (absolutely amazing, dream) opportunity. You know who you are, and I cannot thank you enough for believing in me, supporting me, and proving to me that networking really does work.

And to the new group of amazing ladies I now get to call my coworkers, thank you for welcoming me with open arms and making me feel like one of the gang from day one. I’m so excited to see what the future holds for me at the St. Cloud Area CVB!

#EmilyFayeSays

 

 

Networking vs. Connecting (there’s a difference)

Those who know me in a professional sense know that I love to network. I love going to happy hours, morning get-togethers, lunch and learns, socials – pretty much any opportunity to meet new people. But recently, I attended three events with a week of each other that really started to change the way I think about networking.

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Event #1: NEXT MONDAY LADIES LUNCH, LEARN & NETWORK

This event is put on by a company called Next Monday that specializes in “supporting women with leadership training and executive coaching to hone in on their why – which is their passion and intent and what drives the majority of their decisions.” And they act as a catalyst for bringing smart, talented, driven women together. A friend of mine (who I met through a networking group, go figure) Kelly, has recently started working at Next Monday. She introduced me to their quarterly LLN events. The most recent one was called Connecting with Intention. Tara, the speaker, talked to a group of about 100 women about going beyond the basics in networking. Like how to really connect with others, placing more value on relationship building than network-growing. It was a really inspirational speech (aided by Tara’s sense of humor) that got me thinking about how I can be better at connecting with intention. How can I take it to the next level with my connections? How can I really start to form relationships? One exercise that Tara had us do was to write down 5 people we’d like to have lunch/coffee/drinks with in the next month. So I wrote down my (ambitious) 5, left the meeting feeling inspired, but didn’t actually take any action.

Event #2: NEXT MONDAY HAPPY HOUR

Hosted by the same great company, Kelly invited me to a ladies happy hour at a nice bar in town on the following Monday. For women only, this was just a low-key opportunity to get out of the house one night of the week, meet other women in a relaxed, comfortable setting, and not have to commit to anything (other than a glass of wine, probably). Upon arriving, I saw two women who I knew from other networking groups, so I began to chat with them. One of them, Sarah, introduced me to two of her coworkers. After chatting for a while, I realized that one of them had graduated from the same college, the same year, with the same degree as me. And, we now live within 5 minutes of each other in a small suburb of St. Cloud. We exchanged numbers and promises to meet up at the local watering hole sometime, and I left feeling wholly fulfilled. Not because I had exchanged business cards with every woman in attendance, but because I had made one, real, genuine connection. It felt amazing.

Event #3: WOMEN IN BUSINESS MENTOR MORNING

The following morning, I woke up early to get ready to attend another event I had registered for the previous week. Mentor Morning was another women’s networking-ish event put on by a local media company. I had discovered it the previous Friday, and signed up immediately. Essentially, it was speed-dating for mentors. The event brought around 20 local woman who have excelled in their professional lives, from COO’s to college presidents, to CFO’s to business owners. Mentees could choose 5 women to spend 10 minutes with each to learn a little more about what they do, how they got there, how they overcome professional struggles, etc. As it turns out, two of the women I had on my list from Tara’s event the previous week were mentors – lucky me! I was able to spend time with each of these woman and three others, and it was inspirational, educational, and an absolute blast. Taking notes from Tara’s session again, I followed up afterwards with thank-you’s and we-should-meet-up-sometime requests, and now I am having coffee with one of the women in two days.

Whew 🙂

Let me first say that  I don’t usually attend quite that many events in that time span, but it just worked out that way this time. I will also say that there is something so… satisfying about attending women-only events. We all have something in common. Don’t get me wrong, I’ll happily take advice from or do business with successful gentlemen, but the ability to be real with other women is what makes it so much fun.

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My top pieces of advice that I gathered from all three events?

  • Listen, listen, listen. Everyone loves to talk about themselves, and if you listen well enough to be able to follow-up on certain things – personal or professional – the next time you meet, that’s how relationships grow.
  • Ask questions. Go deeper. Someone mentions they have a son? Don’t just say “that’s great” and move on. Ask his name. Ask how old he is. Ask what he likes to do. Show genuine interest. And remember the answers.
  • Follow up. Send a text, make a phone call, write a note, or even deliver a small, relevant gift – do something after the fact to say “Thank you for meeting with me, I enjoyed it, good luck with XYZ life-event, keep in touch” – simple as that.
  • Don’t blow a connection. At the LLN event, I sat next to a woman I’d never met before, and we had great conversations throughout – laughing, sharing advice, etc. However, when the event was over, I stupidly didn’t ask for her card. I may never talk to her again. I can’t remember her name. I blew that connection. Don’t do that.
  • Be helpful. Find out what that other person needs help with. Whether it’s a referral to a business you’re familiar with, some advice on a resume, or a recipe you talked about, be helpful with your knowledge and abilities – it will be reciprocated.
  • Enjoy yourself. This is probably number one. If I didn’t enjoy meeting people, getting to know their stories, taking the time to develop relationships etc., I wouldn’t be very good at it. Find out who you enjoy connecting with – it will be mutually beneficial.

So there you go. Next time you meet someone that you’d like to get to know better, think about how you can make a geniune connection. Don’t be afraid to take them to coffee. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. If they’re not interested, you will know it, and then you can move on. Now go forth and let your relationships blossom 🙂

#EmilyFayeSays

August LMM Spotlight: Threads Resale Boutique

*This is the second in my monthly series, Local Marketing Masters Spotlight, where I highlight local businesses that are doing something really cool with their marketing. If you have suggestions for my next one, please contact me!*

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When you’re a college freshman, trying to carve a new place for yourself in the world, working to establish your own style, dressing well is a must. So you might just fool yourself into thinking that you need to spend every last dollar of your already miserly paycheck on brand new Buckle jeans and American Eagle tank tops. News flash: Not. Necessary. Why? Thanks to local stores like:

THREADS RESALE BOUTIQUE

How I Heard

I must admit, when I first heard of Threads, I was (like I mentioned) a college freshman, skeptical of “secondhand clothes.” Someone else’s wardrobe? Why would I pay money for that? However, a year or so after graduation I started attending networking events in the St. Cloud area, and I met a local retail shop owner: Kim. She had just started an (adorable) boutique called Evelie Blu Boutique that I had recently become obsessed with, so when I met her I wasted no time in singing my praises.

That was when I found out that she was also the owner of Threads. As I got to know her and her other store better I thought, I should really give Threads a try, since I love Evelie Blu so much. Turns out, it was a great decision. Ahh, the power of networking.

Who they are

This high-end, well organized store buys your gently used name brand clothes and resells them. Not really a revolutionary concept, but at Threads, it’s done really, really well. The clothes they take in are high-quality – they aren’t just some teen’s cleaned out bottom drawer of faded, overused articles. So it’s entirely possible that clothes you buy at Threads will last just as long as brand new pieces you might buy elsewhere. Which. Is. Awesome.

Threads will purchase your gently used, fashionable clothing items and then resell them at an affordable price. You can either opt to be paid in cash, or to be paid in store credit and get 20% more back for your items. They also have a prom dress resale program that I totally wish had been around when I was of prom age, where you can sell your old prom dresses on consignment through the store.

What they do well

  • Threads excels at being relevant. When your target audience is college-aged women interested in affordable fashion, you have to make sure your messaging is in line with theirs. That’s where their social media skills come in. With posts like #OOTW (outfit of the week), #reThread (where they copy a celeb’s outfit with clothes from the store), and #NewMerchMonday (highlighting new items they’ve recently gotten in), fashionable young women can’t help but follow. So relevant.

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  • threads3They know their target audience is
    cheap. Let me rephrase, they know
    their target audience is budget-conscious. So they make it easy to fine more ways to save. They have a punch card program to receive awards as you spend money at Threads. It keeps you coming back, and reminds you that they appreciate and want to reward you for your loyalty.
  • Threads knows how to reach their audience where they are – and does so in a non-intrusive fashion. They could easily send out an email daily, or even weekly – but that’s not the case. Instead, emails only come maybe twice a month, and each time I WILL read it. I always think to myself: “Are there deals in here? There must be, because they don’t send these that often.”

<<<< For example, this email right here caused me to go into Threads that day and buy a pair of pants for $3 (not to mention 2 tops and a skirt that were not on sale…)

 

  • On top of all the marketing and advertising techniques that I love, the girls who work there are what really keep me coming back. Friendly, fashionable and extremely helpful, I look forwards to walking in the door. Whether it’s helping me piece together an outfit or chatting with me about which dress I look better in, they never disappoint me with their customer service.

What it (likely) cost them

If one thing is true with effective marketing, it’s that often it takes more time than money to really be successful. Such it the case with Threads. Their social media presence makes that evident. It takes time to put together outfits from the store, to find celebrity outfits to compare to, and to actually go out and post these items on the various social channels they use. Combine that with the printing of their loyalty cards and writing/designing & using email (which I discovered is through Constant Contact) and you’re looking at maybe $1,000 – $2,000 a year. The real value of their marketing lies in dedicated, knowledgeable employees who live and breathe the Threads brand and promise. That doesn’t have a price tag.

Threads Resale Boutique is proof that businesses can be successful on a limited marketing budget, and that’s just one of the reasons I love them. I am a bargain hunter at heart, so places like Threads are near and dear to me. As a loyal fan, I will continue to look forwards to social media posts, rack up my loyalty card punches, and get excited over email offers.

#EmilyFayeSays 🙂

Local Marketing Masters Spotlight

Hello! Long time no chat! I wish I had a valid excuse for why I’ve been absent from blogging, but truthfully I just hit a topic wall. HOWEVER, thanks to a recent trip to a local business, I’ve got a new idea to run with. Introducing:

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I intend to write once a month about a different business in the St. Cloud, MN area that is doing really well in some aspect(s) of marketing. Specifically, I hope to show other small businesses that, even if you can’t afford a multimedia campaign, you can still be really successful in your marketing if you’re strategic.

The other fun part? I’m looking for your input! Have you had a really positive interaction with a local business? Have you seen some kind of marketing material from a local business and thought: “now that’s innovative”? Well then, please share! I’d love your feedback on other local businesses that are killing it with their marketing. Let me know!

#EmilyFayeSays

Staying productive during downtime

We all have it every once in a while (that includes you, busy-braggers) (you know who  you are): downtime. And while we may not admit it, we’ve all passed that time with mindless activities, be it chatting with coworkers about nonsense, perusing Facebook until our eyes burn, or scoring some sweet (unnecessary) deals from our favorite online retailer.

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But as a young professional – especially one looking to stand out in their career field – how can we better-fill that downtime? How can you see it less as a detriment and more as a chance to grow? Here are some ideas that have worked for me.

Read industry news/blogs. 

Pretty obvious, but sometimes it’s hard to find that good content. Often times, your employer will already have online subscriptions to industry-related news sources that you didn’t even know about. Or, if you’re familiar with influential individuals in your industry, see if they have a blog or something like it that you can check out regularly. Being in the marketing industry with a passion for social media, here are a few sites/blogs that I frequent:

Convince & Convert

Adweek

TechCrunch

Social Media Examiner

Pro Tip: Subscribe to your favorite new sites’ email newsletters! Then you don’t have to hunt.

Jack up your LinkedIn. 

Notice I didn’t just say “LinkedIn Profile.” While I’ll never bash perfecting your profile, LinkedIn has even more than that to offer. Check out Pulse (under Interests) for articles related to your interests and industry. Follow companies you care about to stay up to date on their posts. Engage with clients, colleagues, and others in your network to grow your presence. Follow industry influencers to stay knowledgeable.

Pro Tip: Make sure you’re not viewing profiles anonymously, and then view with purpose. LinkedIn notifies users when someone views their profile, so if you’re looking to show up in someone influential’s notifications, it’s a good, non-invasive way.

Grow as a social media professional. 

When I first started in the world of marketing, all of my social media accounts were for personal use only. And that’s not to say I was posting inappropriate pictures or vulgar statuses all over, but I simply wasn’t using social for a professional purpose.

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Fast-forward 2 months, and I really started to gain an understanding for how I could use social media, specifically Twitter, in a professional sense. So, I decided to create a “professional-only” Twitter account, and I also took the privacy settings off of my Instagram account. Not only do I now use them for connecting with colleagues & clients, but they are now my “window to the world” in the marketing industry. I use them to connect with industry professionals to gain knowledge on industry trends. I use them to connect with others at industry-related events I attend. Plus, I love using my Twitter account for industry “chats” (specifically #AdweekChat). While I don’t devote every waking second to them, I do take advantage of downtime to update my profiles, find interesting things to share, discover new people to follow – you get the picture.

Pro Tip: While you should always keep a professional tone on your professional social media accounts, it’s okay to be silly/fun. Don’t sound like a robot – make jokes, comment genuinely, and, well, be a human!

Go above and beyond for your client/company. 

This might already be expected, but often times we’re too busy to devote time to it and then forget when we actually have time. Think about it: how can you go above and beyond to either wow the client or improve things within your company (or department)? Devote 20 minutes or so during downtime to thinking up “free ideas” for clients. Or spend 10 minutes chatting with coworkers about a certain work process to see how others feel it could be improved. Who knows, you might just come up with a big solution!

Pro Tip: Regularly block out time on your calendar for brainstorming. Good ideas often come from a flowing thought process, so avoiding interruptions can make for the best results.

& when all else fails… take a break.

I used to work for a company that allowed 15 minute breaks ever morning and afternoon to go for a group walk around the development. It might seem like a waste of time, but so often I came back more awake and energized and ready to start pumping out some great work. Removing your brain from the task at hand can recharge your system and get you re-inspired. Just make sure to check with your employer first 🙂

Pro Tip: If a walk isn’t your thing, offer to make a coffee run to a local Caribou or Starbucks. Ask your coworkers if they want anything. Not only will it get you out of the office for 15 minutes or so, but you’ll be delivering smiles (& caffeine) to your coworkers – win/win!

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What do you do with your downtime? How do you stay busy? Share your tips in the comments! & as always, thanks for checking out what #EmilyFayeSays!

6 Traits of Ad Agency Folks

The ad-agency clique. We’re a quirky bunch. We’re all creatives at heart, but only some of us have the gift of bringing it to life (read: not me). We are not afraid to be daring. To take risks. We’re the guy at the party who is dancing like a maniac and everyone is embarrassed for him but he doesn’t notice because he’s just having a blast.

We’re the one guy at your Super Bowl party who yells at everyone to shut up during the commercials. We’re that one girl you follow on Twitter who uses branded hashtags in almost every tweet. We’re that loud group out for happy hour, drinking wine & craft beer, critiquing various logos & menu copy while checking our iPhones at 2 minute intervals.

We’re kind of a handful.

So if you too find yourself involved with one of our kind some day, here are 6 Traits of Ad Agency Folks.

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We are on our phones a lot. I mean, everyone spends a lot of time on their phone, that’s for sure. But when I say a lot, I’m talking responding-to-a-tweet-at-3am-on-a-Tuesday-because-we-can’t-resist-a lot. Whether it’s staying active on social, responding to client requests, rushing to meet an impossible deadline, we are always connected.

 

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We geek out on marketing & media strategies. This includes, but is not limited to: Super Bowl commercials, creative/effective hashtag use, well-executed pop-culture references in client advertising, viral trends that work well for brands, superior customer engagement, and beyond. We live for this shit, so don’t tease us.

 

risky

We are risk-takers. We are always trying to push our clients to go one step further, to agree to the risqué cheeseburger ad, to promote a 24-hour social media contest/challenge, to get outside their comfort zone (and into ours). This translates to other areas of our life. We push ourselves and others around us to be daring – to take leaps of faith – to not be afraid to look silly.

 

outgoing

We are inherently outgoing. Even the recluse creative has an extrovert hiding inside – it’s what we do. Our job is to connect with people – to craft messages, strategies, tactics etc. that get people to react in a certain way. So it only makes sense that we’re people-people (albeit some more overtly than others).

 

help

We don’t like to see others fail. At our core, we want everyone we work with, professionally or personally, to succeed. We always have our clients best interest in mind, and we carry that home with us to our families. Awards are fun & recognition is always nice, but in the end what we really care about is making others happy and successful.

 

fun

We love to have fun. We can’t help it. For many of us, that’s why we chose this life. We enjoy the wacky. The outlandish. The modern. The unique.  We live and breath creativity, communication, and craziness. And we wouldn’t have it any other way.

What do you think? Do you fit these traits? Did I miss anything? Share your thoughts by commenting on what #EmilyFayeSays